Sunday, March 15, 2020

The Pieta by Michelangelo

The Pieta by Michelangelo Free Online Research Papers At 22, a relatively unknown artist by the name of Michelangelo created a marble sculpture that continues to be seen by people around the world in the Vatican City of Rome. This piece named The Pieta has been sculpted from a single slab of marble from the Pits of Carrara. In Germany during the 13th-Century, the earliest representation of The Pieta was created into a polychromed wood sculpture. In Italy during the 14th-Century, The Pieta was mostly painted on side panels of altarpieces devoted to the Passion. In 1498, Michelangelo was commissioned to do a life size representation of The Pieta measuring 1.74m x 1.95m. He sculpted four versions, but only finished one. It took him two years to finish this magnificent sculpture. His interpretation of the Pieta was far different than the ones created previously by other artists. Various painters and sculptures have created the Pieta, which depicts the Virgin Mary holding the body of her son Jesus Christ after his death, in many different forms. In Michelangelo’s Pieta, the Virgin Mary is seen as a youthful, serene, and celestial young woman indifferent to the classic style of a broken-hearted, old woman. This is especially important when you consider that the sculpture is of a mother holding her dying son in her arms. To emphasize Mary’s empowerment over her son’s dead body, Michelangelo sculpted her very large and angelic like, with her clothing draping down like a waterfall. Her son, who just suffered through the crucifixion, seems to show no signs of the Passion as his face is serene and absent of any facial wounds. The only signs that the crucifixion actually took place are that of the wounds on his side, hands and feet. Michelangelos work always gives me a very pleasant feeling when I look at it. He shares his opinions through his work without any regret. Michelangelos sculpture of The Pieta depicts a very informal view of Mary holding Jesus Christ after his death. The overall mood of the sculpture is very enlightening and angelic. If I had no idea who these two people are in the sculpture, I would look at this picture and see a loving mother holding her dying son in her arms. The warmth in Marys eyes pulls you down to her son’s body, and then the draping around the bottom pulls you down to the floor. The cloth that is draped over Mary and over the bottom of the sculpture looks almost real. The softness and the detail of it make you believe that you are seeing the real thing. In conclusion, I believe that The Pieta by Michelangelo is one of his most magnificent pieces of sculpture. All elements of the compositionthe position of the left arm of Jesus, the angles formed by his knees, and the folds of Marys draperywork toward a gentle unity of design that contrasts sharply with earlier versions of the subject. I believe that Michelangelos Pieta transformed the late medieval devotional image into a monumental statement on the meaning of Christian Sacrifice. This magnificent sculpture will be seen throughout the future as a very influential and inspirational piece of artwork. Research Papers on The Pieta by MichelangeloMind TravelHip-Hop is ArtAnalysis Of A Cosmetics AdvertisementThe Spring and Autumn19 Century Society: A Deeply Divided EraThe Fifth HorsemanMarketing of Lifeboy Soap A Unilever ProductThe Hockey GameAssess the importance of Nationalism 1815-1850 EuropeThe Masque of the Red Death Room meanings

Friday, February 28, 2020

Object Oriented Metrics Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2500 words

Object Oriented Metrics - Essay Example This paper therefore discloses three perspectives under which Object Oriented metrics can be considered. The first one is the fault analysis by OOM, types and new metrics and finally their functions Based on Object Oriented Metrics there are two types of faulty and these include the type I, type II and type III faults. Type I and II are the ones termed as OO faults and type III ones are the non- OO faults. The type I faults are mostly connected to the Object Oriented (OO) and are normally introduced by features such as Inheritance and Polymorphism. The type I faults therefore can be categorized further into two sub-divisions. These are the Inheritance faults and Polymorphism faults derived from the features introducing the faults (Fenton, 1991). The Inheritance OO fault majority is introduced or occur when derived class modifies data / information member of the base class and this finally changes the behavior of the base class, causing the fault in the long runs modification results into changing the environment of the base class that inform causes faults encountered. Then faults caused are either encountered in the derived class or the base class. Polymorphism fault is another type of object oriented fault encountered on the O... For example when two objects send different bindings to send a service request then the total combination is the product of the findings from the two objects - resulting into different combination binding into the occurrence of a fault called Polymorphism fault. The fault actually occurs when testing is not done in the testing phase (Harrison, 1988). The type II faults are special kinds of OO characterized by object copying, dangling reference and object memory usage faults objects copying fault occur if there is a duplication of the original object or the generation of a reference to the original object. This occurs during the implementation of the method of copying whereby the copying method may be incorrect. Dangling reference fault from the word Dangle meaning hang or swing without anything stopping it. Therefore, Dangling reference fault is experienced when an object say object X tries to reference another object say Y that was destroyed by a third object say object Z. the object memory usage fault on the other hand happens when an object allocates during the run time allocates memory but fails to remove the information when no longer required. Basically, this is how the object oriented memory usage fault occurs (Basil, Bariand and Melo, 1996). The type III faults are also called / referred to as a non - OO faults because they are not related to objects. They are traditional faults therefore are classified under the traditional software (Harrison 1988). After looking at the object oriented faults, it is therefore logical to be able to understand the object Oriented Metrics. These are system softwares that are developed to realize the structure and the

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Society and Culture Aims and Objectives Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Society and Culture Aims and Objectives - Essay Example This could be said to be the capacity of the human beings to affect choices between alternatives, and to exercise and to impose those choices on society. It is normally contrasted to common forces, which are causes involving only spontaneous processes. Human agencies envisages the apparent claims that humans do, in fact, make decisions and endorse them on How humans come to make decisions, by free choice or other processes, is another issue.(Agency(Philosophy) 2008). Individualized human behaviour is a complex and intricate process of the human mind and behaviour, although aspects of group behaviours patterns could be predicted with reasonable degree of certainly and accuracy. The mental buildup and behaviourism of criminal thoughts and actions could offer analysis on its workings. It has earlier been explained that structure deals with the grouping, or collective mass of homogenous or, even heterogeneous matters to form a social structure or arrangement. In the criminal settings, a prison, or a penitentiary may serve to act as a social structure, group or setting. Even in terms of psychiatry, which relies heavily on sociology and social behaviourism, crime could be explained in terms of perverse or anti-social connotations. More than a desire to accumulate wealth, or money, criminal minds works to wreck revenge or retribution on the establishment since they may, at some time, have suffered deprivations at its hands. Again, the structure of the criminal mind, or the process of criminalised society is an offshoot of the social structure, which forms the basis of this paper. Centralization of wealth: Thus, it is seen that social structures creates avenues for disillusionment for people in terms of wealthy cliques, class differences and other subgroups. This in turn, may centralize wealth or potential for wealth in the hands of a select few to the exclusion of the toiling masses. The disparities in the social groups give rise to disillusionment, frustration, poverty and resultant criminal behaviour. Nevertheless, one could argue that criminals are present e vent in the wealthy groups, so where does the nexus between social groups and crime, organized or otherwise, arise When we consider that a wealthy criminal is governed not by class considerations but his intentions to negate society, to dominate and control it, to the exclusions of others, including legally elected Governments of countries. In the case of India, in parts of Northern provinces, people pay taxes to the local Mafiosi's and not to government, since they are well aware that the government cannot protect their lives or properties, but the Mafias could. These organized criminal groups or

Friday, January 31, 2020

The literary of Philip Sidney Research Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

The literary of Philip Sidney - Research Paper Example He was also able to get a university education: something that was only available to a few individual of his time and this inspired his appreciation of literary work. His work was not restricted to writing alone. Sidney was a very ambitious man and sought to have an impact in the political arena that often got him in trouble with the queen. For instance, he protested openly against the marriage of between a catholic duke and Queen Elizabeth (Duncan-Jones, 21). This led to him being banished from Queen Elizabeth’s Court. He now retired to his family estate at Wilton. Politics was the main theme in the Lady of May. It was written in 1578, while Queen Elizabeth was in a dilemma of accepting or refusing the marriage proposal of the Duke of Alencon. She was invited by the Earl of Leicester to his mansion, the Queen accepted the invitation, and stayed several days at the luxurious mansion where Sir Philip Sidney then presented and performed the play, The Lady of May was written for the occasion and for the entertainment of the queen. This writing might be called persuasive and political, because it was designed to win the favor of the queen and to influence political affairs. The Lady of May indicates the literary tradition of pastoral style of writing. Pastoral is a literary style or type of writing that shows the conventional image of rural life. Pastoral literatures are written from the point of view of rural characters, especially of shepherds. In some way, concerns in pastoral works are the tensions between nature and art, and the actual and the mythical. English Renaissance pastoral has traditional roots, nevertheless, it contains distinctly contemporary English foundations, including humanism, sentimentality, depictions of court reality, an anxiety of with real life and the use of sardonic and comedy. One cannot ignore the influence that her mother had on Sidney literary work. This

Thursday, January 23, 2020

GREECE :: essays research papers

Greece   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The two most dominating city-states in Greece of their time, Athens and Sparta, were great rivals with two very different ways of life. Sparta’s overbearing military and Athens’ impartial justice system and government are models for many modern day countries. Even though these two city-states differ greatly from one another, they share many characteristics of their country and their time period.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Athens and Sparta were the two most powerful Greek territories of their time. Like most cities of the same country, they have the same Greek culture, worshipping the same Greek gods and speaking Greek. Like all Greeks, their people loved to talk and tell stories. Although they fought against each other, their citizens equally had great amounts of pride for their entire country as well as their city-states. The two rivals were both devoted mainly to agriculture and based their wealth, but not their success, on agriculture. Both also participated in the annual Olympics, an ancient Greek national athletic competition which is now a worldwide tradition. These to Greek city-states were the most feared city-states in all of Greece.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Though Athens and Sparta were similar, they were also very different. Athens was the first democracy, and it was also the first to govern with trial by jury. Athens’ main accomplishment was that it had a very strong Navy. It was the command of the sea and the head of the Naval Alliance, or the Delian League. Athens was the most feared city-state to fight at sea. Its other achievements were that is had excellent forms of art, architecture, drama and literature, philosophy, science, and medicine. It was very wealthy and had beautiful, extravagant temples. The boys of Athens went to school between the ages of five and eighteen, where they learned reading, writing, mathematics, music, poetry, sports and gymnastics. The girls stayed at home and learned spinning, weaving and domestic arts. Athens had well educated men, a good sense of art, and an all-powerful navy.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Sparta developed the most powerful military oligarchy of their time. They had a very strong army and were the most feared city-state to fight on land. Sparta was a member of the Peloponnesian League and was the most powerful people in it. Its excellent military conquered many territories, which they controlled with slaves. Sparta’s sole achievement, other than military supremacy, was that its people possessed a simple life style, with no care for the arts of Athens. GREECE :: essays research papers Greece   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The two most dominating city-states in Greece of their time, Athens and Sparta, were great rivals with two very different ways of life. Sparta’s overbearing military and Athens’ impartial justice system and government are models for many modern day countries. Even though these two city-states differ greatly from one another, they share many characteristics of their country and their time period.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Athens and Sparta were the two most powerful Greek territories of their time. Like most cities of the same country, they have the same Greek culture, worshipping the same Greek gods and speaking Greek. Like all Greeks, their people loved to talk and tell stories. Although they fought against each other, their citizens equally had great amounts of pride for their entire country as well as their city-states. The two rivals were both devoted mainly to agriculture and based their wealth, but not their success, on agriculture. Both also participated in the annual Olympics, an ancient Greek national athletic competition which is now a worldwide tradition. These to Greek city-states were the most feared city-states in all of Greece.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Though Athens and Sparta were similar, they were also very different. Athens was the first democracy, and it was also the first to govern with trial by jury. Athens’ main accomplishment was that it had a very strong Navy. It was the command of the sea and the head of the Naval Alliance, or the Delian League. Athens was the most feared city-state to fight at sea. Its other achievements were that is had excellent forms of art, architecture, drama and literature, philosophy, science, and medicine. It was very wealthy and had beautiful, extravagant temples. The boys of Athens went to school between the ages of five and eighteen, where they learned reading, writing, mathematics, music, poetry, sports and gymnastics. The girls stayed at home and learned spinning, weaving and domestic arts. Athens had well educated men, a good sense of art, and an all-powerful navy.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Sparta developed the most powerful military oligarchy of their time. They had a very strong army and were the most feared city-state to fight on land. Sparta was a member of the Peloponnesian League and was the most powerful people in it. Its excellent military conquered many territories, which they controlled with slaves. Sparta’s sole achievement, other than military supremacy, was that its people possessed a simple life style, with no care for the arts of Athens.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

My Philosophy of Leadership

MY PHILOSOPHY OF LEADERSHIP Christine Harris Byrd In my own definition, leadership is an attitude, not a position or routine, and not based on one certain formula or method. It is based on one’s experiences and personal values, and therefore no two leaders will never be the same. There are only a few characteristics that categorize them together. Leaders are those whose actions reflect their heart. They inspire themselves and others in a way that creates a chain reaction of positive events, thoughts, changes, and of course, attitudes.Whether their attitude affects a whole society or one single person, they are a leader because they genuinely care for the well-being of others and live according to their own principles. Most importantly, a leader is one who does not settle. They are always striving to grow as an individual, learn more, accomplish more, and challenge the norm. Based on my personal experiences it is prevalent that I will become more of a transformational leader ve rsus being a transactional leader. So much of my growth has been based on inner-challenges and the influence of other leaders.I agree with the concept that stresses the importance of â€Å"powerful personal characteristics† and using your talents and skills to help and influence others. I have a fiery personality, which means I become very passionate for what is important to me and let my emotions dictate how I think, feel, and act. Most distinctively I believe that the main purpose of our actions is to aspire for happiness. One cannot truthfully portray leadership if his actions do not make him happy. To put it simply, I believe that being a transformational leader is a lifestyle.Never does one reach an end point or master the skill. As they strive to transform others, they too continue to grow. There are five main components of my personal leadership philosophy. The first and foundational component on which it is built on is â€Å"hard work. † An important part of ha ving a leadership attitude is by illustrating your words through tangible actions. Rolling up your sleeves and diving in or â€Å"going the extra mile† establish both credibility and respect. In my experience, hard work can also come in the form of a weakness.I am most content when I can just put my head down and work, but I have learned that when working together with others, I have to be conscious of other’s opinions and pace. I believe that it also means that one has to be resilient because the harder you work and the more times that you put yourself out there, the higher the chances are that you are going to fail. The difference between someone who succeeds and someone who does not is how one reacts to the situation. The second component is to be a â€Å"forever student. † John F.Kennedy defined this perfectly when he said, â€Å"Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other. † Whether we are working in our area of expertise, teaching someon e else, or simply living there is always room for improvement. I believe that everyone has a story to tell and by listening we are exposed to a new perspective that changes the way we see things or strengthens our standing beliefs. This also ties in to the idea of not being an individual who settles. Being curious, asking questions, and purely just listening are some of the most essential habits a leader can have; they are the spark plug for creativity.Components three and four are closely connected. To â€Å"be happy† and â€Å"have passion,† as previously mentioned, are two characteristics that are naturally intertwined with our personalities and functional needs. Often time’s leaders struggle with their conscious over taking the path that they are expected to take and the one that makes them happy. In a society where â€Å"time is of the essence† we as leaders must prioritize. Happiness is the key to what makes each of us tick and passion is the specia l ingredient that creates determination, energy, focus, and a servant heart.I know that I am going to have more respect and admiration for an individual who is steadfast and passionate, regardless if their beliefs and priorities align with mine. The fifth and most personal component for me is to â€Å"take risks. † Every situation we approach in life involves some sort of risk. Every decision, experience, action, goal, and emotion has both a positive and negative outlook. The final lines of a quote that has become my personal motto can best define this component: Risks must be taken, because the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing.The person, who risks nothing, does nothing, has nothing, and is nothing. He may avoid suffering and sorrow, but he simply cannot learn feel, change, grow, love, or live. Chained by his certitudes, he is a slave, he has forfeited freedom. Only a person who risks is free. As individuals who continue to strive for that leadership attitude, we h ave to be able to throw all cards down on the table, and continue to do it over and over if we ever expect any gain or satisfaction. Of course as the most challenging component, it is also the most important.Ultimately is all boils down to the question of â€Å"did I give everything; do everything that I possibly could to make the outcome positive? † If so, then regardless of the outcome, you have shown positive leadership. The leadership theories that best describe my personal philosophy are servant and authentic leadership. The life-changing experiences and memories that have had the most significant impact on my life are the ones that challenged me to become a better person and that came from the kindness of others.I have seen firsthand how hard work, learning, happiness, passion, and taking risks can change one’s purpose in life and have learned that when we surround ourselves with those components and others who share them, it creates a positive chain reaction. I value the opportunity to live based on my personal values and firmly believe in leadership that is modeled to serve and benefit from each other. I have always believed that effective leadership encourages everyone to participate in the decision making process.The effective leader is one who can clearly articulate the vision of the organization to all stakeholders in a meaningful and accessible way. The simplest way to describe my personal belief about effective leadership is that , â€Å"the (leader) needs to model what management researcher Robert Greenleaf called servant leadership- a philosophy that encourages collaboration, trust, foresight, listening, and ethical use of power and empowerment. † (Krajewski, 2004). My mission is, as a leader and a follower, to empower those around me to use their natural alents to assist the organization as well as themselves. I believe that the foundation of effective leadership is personal integrity. My actions will serve as an example f or others and will be based upon honesty, respect and fairness. I will keep my word and will treat people fairly and with respect for diversity and the rights of each individual. I will trust the members of my team to make sound, ethical decisions and I will guide and support them. I also aim to develop, through example, a learning community among my co-workers. As a leader, my goal is to be a collaborator.Everyone has something unique to bring to the table. It is my hope that they environment that I co-create encourages awareness and cultivation of this authenticity. DePree (1989) defines leadership as follows: â€Å"The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality. The last is to say thank you. In between the two, the leader must become a servant and a debtor. † References: . De Pree, Max. The Art of Leadership. New York: Doubleday, 1987. Leadership . Krajewski, Bob. . In Their Own Words. Learning From Urban Schools Pages 14-18. March 2005 | Volume 62 | Number 6

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Effects Of Scaffolding On The Zone Of Proximal Development

This study will be focused on the concept of scaffolding and its relation to the zone of proximal development. In regard to scaffolding, this study will observe it impact on children completing eight different – yet almost identical in difficulty – puzzles over the course of two months, vs. a control group who have no aid in regard to scaffolding. The puzzles will be just outside the child’s age range (ex. For children 6-8) with the children all being 5.) Research into scaffolding is relevant to child development, as the conclusion of its helpful or detrimental effects can aid in researchers more comprehensive understanding of how children learn, and could aid in teaching them more effectively. This study will measure the child’s increasing competency and speed in completing a task (the arrangement of a puzzle) just outside their age range with, or without the assistance of a more competent helper. In addition to the observed task, the study will first provide a â€Å"teaching† class in which the children will be informed of what their task will be and how it is typically completed. (â€Å"The pieces of the puzzle can be arranged to form a picture!†) After this, the study will record information by looking at the time it takes the child to complete the task after the â€Å"teaching class† in addition to their accuracy in doing so with or without a more competent helper. This study will use the micro-genetic study method in determining the effects of scaffolding. Although the study willShow MoreRelatedVygotsky - Zone of Proximal Development Essay example1322 Words   |  6 PagesHow can Vygotsky’s notion of the ‘Zone of Proximal Development’, and the related concept of ‘scaffolding’, be used to provide appropriate education and support to the full range of students in the classroom? Teaching is not just a matter of standing in front of a class and distributing knowledge to a group of learners. Teaching is a much more complex procedure that requires educators to consider a variety of educational components in order to maximize a learner’s true potential. Teachers are responsibleRead MoreVygotsky s Theory Of Cognitive Development917 Words   |  4 Pagesthat a child (or anybody, for that matter) can learn. Hoy and Margetts (2012) demonstrate that cognitive development is much more than the addition of new facts and ideas to an existing store of information - maturation, activity and social transmission influence cognitive development. One very respected researcher of cognitive development and, in particular, sociocultural effects on such development, was Lev Vygotsky, whose original Russian journal articles are now available in English. Vygotsky’sRead MoreLev Vygotsky s Theory Of Cultural Development Essay1399 Words   |  6 Pagescompleting a law degree, writing a dissertation on the psychology of art, teaching and publishing literary works, and finally turning his attention to fundamental questions of human development and learning, where he made his biggest impact in the psychological field. Vygotsky proposed a general genetic law of cultural development in which cognitive function occurs on two planes: first on the social (between individuals), followed by the individual (internalized by the child) (Bjorklund, 2005). For a numberRead MoreVygotsky ´s Zone Proximal Development Essay825 Words   |  4 Pagesimpact on developmental psychology. One of his main contributions was the idea of zone proximal development. He places emphasis the shaping of cognitive development. He is one of the first in children development that emphasized on cultural context. I have chosen his theory and what it entails for this paper because its very interesting and some certain parts of his theory like scaffolding and the zone proximal development were relatable to my experience at my field site. This theorist believed thatRead MoreVygotsky s Theory Of Internalisation1709 Words   |  7 Pagesdeveloped by Piaget, Vygotsky also characterised children as â€Å"active agents in their development†. (Duchesne, S., McMaugh, A.,2016p.103). As explained by Vygotsky in his theory, he suggests that development of a child can be attained socially as the child being the participant is being ‘internalised’ by the individual the child is interacting with (S.thinsan,2011), as Vygotsky mentioned ‘the direction of development is the social interaction with the individual’. (Duchesne, S., McMaugh, A.,2016Read MoreThe Impact Of Social Constructivist On Children s Development1461 Words   |  6 Pagesthink and learn at home, school and the environment around them. They believe that children’s development is assisted by adults as a natural progression instead of children’s developmental capacities occurring in stages at specific ages. (SMITH, Early Learning and Child Care, 2012) Jean Piaget was a biologist that studied his own children and thought children go through different stages of cognitive development grounded on four set stages. Piaget believed that children learn and develop best throughRead More Guidance of Young Children1178 Words   |  5 Pagesa particular student to the entire classroom, it only makes the child that is being reprimanded feel alienated, ashamed, embarrassed, or possibly revengeful. 4. I relate most with cognitive theories of development. Piaget provides the foundation by explaining the distinct stages of development. His insights allow teachers and parents to have a basis of what children are capable of during each stage. If the child drastically strays from these stages, it allows the caring adults to take actionRead MoreA Comparison of Theorists989 Words   |  4 Pagesthe Early Childhood Education. Lev Vygotsky and Jean Piaget are two of the many theorists that benefit the teachers and parents to comprehend their children learning development. The paper will compare the two theorists and their difference of their cognitive development. Jean Piaget vs. Lev Vygotsky Jean Piaget cognitive development theory explained the changes of logical thinking of children and adolescent. Piaget suggested that children advance four stages based on maturity and experience. PiagetRead MoreVygotsky s Theory Of Cognitive Development1365 Words   |  6 PagesCognitive Development the Biopsychosocial Framework In researching various development theories, one of those that stand out is cognitive development theory. Cognitive development theory studies â€Å"how people think and how thinking changes over time† (Kail Cavanaugh, 14). One of the leading theorists in this area was Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky. He was one of the first theorists to consider the sociocultural influences on a child’s development. His research allowed the development of keyRead MoreThe Role Of Primary Carers On Children1716 Words   |  7 Pageswithin the child’s setting has an influence on the child; affirming just how crucial it is for practitioners to be in partnership with parents. From a social constructivist perspective, parents and carers are key in child development. Vygotsky theorized that cognitive development was achieved through social interaction. He stated that without the support of a ‘more knowledgeable other’ (MKO) children were unable to build upon their knowledge of a particular subject. The MKO may refer to a parent,